Okinawa Shorin-ryu
New Zealand
Matsubayashi-ryu karate & kobudo
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Okinawa Shorin Ryu New Zealand
Matsubayashi Ryu
Karate - Kobudo

Kobudo
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Okinawa Shorin Ryu New Zealand Copyright 2006
Kodokan Matsubayashi ryu  incorporates the use of Okinawan weapons and has a rich history and lineage associated with many of the Island's most renowned kobudo masters. Matsubayashi ryu kobudo uses the same stances and theory of movement as found within the empty hand kata.
Our dojo currently train with:
Kobudo. Bo
Kobudo. Sai
Kobudo. Kama
Kobudo. Tonfa
Kobudo
"...success in budo does not necessarily rely on how you are built; rather, it depends on how strenuously you try to train yourself "    
Chofu Kyan
Shinyei Kyan, an eminent master,  was primarily responsible for the teaching and transmission of Rokushaku Bo-jutsu and Sai-jutsu technique within the Nagamine honbu dojo. Kyan sensei  was well known throughout Okinawa for his powerful Sai technique and Bo kata.

It is these forms that are retained and attributed to Kyan sensei's teaching and are unique to the kobudo curriculum of Matsubayashi ryu;

  • Sai dai ichi
  • Hanagushiku (Hanagusuku) no sai
  • Kyan no sai
  • Shiromatsu no kun
  • Shirotaro no kun
Kodokan Matsubayashi ryu  incorporates the use of Okinawan weapons and has a rich history and lineage associated with many of the Island's most renowned kobudo masters. Matsubayashi ryu kobudo uses the same stances and theory of movement as found within the empty hand kata.
Shinyei Kyan sensei.
Shinyei Kyan sensei & senior Matsubayashi Ryu karateka
Shinyei Kyan sensei
Our dojo currently train with:
  • Rokushaku Bo
  • Sai
  • Kama
  • Tonfa
  • Nunchaku
A photo featured in Taira dojo - Taira Sensei and Kyan sensei
Chogi Kishaba, a Yamanni ryu expert, is the second notable influence on the Bo-jutsu traditions with in Matsubayashi ryu kobudo. Kishaba sensei is widely respected for his technique and skill with the Bo. He has taught many senior Matsubayashi ryu yudansha the Yamanni ryu tradition's of ;

  • Shushi no kun
  • Sakugawa no kun
  • Shirataru no kun
  • Shinakachi no kun
  • Yonegawa no kun
  • Choun no kun
Chogi Kishaba sensei
Shinyei Kyan sensei.
Matsubayashi Ryu New Zealand
Transmission of Rokushaku Bo-jutsu and Sai-jutsu

Kevin Plaisted.
Matsubayashi ryu NZ
Timothy Herlihy.
Yoshitaka Taira
Taira dojo

Nobuhide Higa
Taira dojo

Chogi Kishaba
Shinyei Kyan
Masami Chinen
Shosei Kina
Oshiro Chojo
Kentsu Yabu
Hanashiro Chomo
Izumikawa Kantoku
Shinyei Kyan sensei & senior Matsubayashi Ryu karateka
Shinyei Kyan, an eminent master,  was primarily responsible for the teaching and transmission of Rokushaku Bo-jutsu and Sai-jutsu technique within the Nagamine honbu dojo. Kyan sensei  was well known throughout Okinawa for his powerful Sai technique and Bo kata.
 Shihan Plaisted  and Shihandai Herlihy have,  on many occasions when in Okinawa, had the unique opportunity to view  private karate and kobudo video's at the house of Shihandai Nobuhide Higa. This collection of video's features many of Matsubayashi Ryu's past and present masters performing empty hand and kobudo kata at various demonstration's and location's such as Nagamine Honbu dojo and Shima dojo etc.
It is hoped that the opportunity will be extended  to the New Zealanders to view, once again, these and many more of Shihandai Higa's fascinating Matsubayashi Ryu collection.
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Bo
It is these forms that are retained and attributed to Kyan sensei's teaching and are unique to the kobudo curriculum of Matsubayashi ryu;

  • Sai dai ichi
  • Hanagushiku (Hanagusuku) no sai
  • Kyan no sai
  • Shiromatsu no kun
  • Shirotaro no kun
Kancho Taira with bo
Herlihy sensei with bo
Bo kata
Bo kata practiced within Matsubayashi Ryu NZ dojo
under the guidance of :
Kancho, Yoshitaka Taira, Hanshi 10th dan
and Shihandai, Nobuhide Higa, Hanshi 9th dan.

Shushi no kun ichi - view video
Shushi no kun ni
Choun no kun ichi - view video
Choun no kun ni - view video
Shiromatsu no kun ichi
Shiromatsu no kun ni - view video
Shirotaro no kun ichi
Shirotaro no kun ni
Sakugawa no kun
Kancho, YoshitakaTaira,  demonstrates  the Rokushaku bo  during a visit to New Zealand.
The Bo (often called kun or kon) is a staff of hard wood usually oak about 1800mm long and 25mm - 28mm in diameter. It was originally used as a tool to carry loads and also served as a fighting tool when the occasion arose. In Okinawa there are many varieties of the art of bo-jutsu. Our dojo follow the Matsubayashi Ryu / Yamanni Ryu Bo technique as taught in Kodokan Taira dojo. Direct lines of development are via the Shinyei Kyan  and Chogi Kishaba  lineages.
1. SAKI - End
2. MOTO - Middle
3. SAKI - End
bo parts
Sai
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Chogi Kishaba,
a Yamanni ryu expert, is the second notable influence on the Bo-jutsu traditions with in Matsubayashi ryu kobudo. Kishaba sensei is widely respected for his technique and skill
Chogi Kishaba sensei
Herlihy sensei with sai
pair of sai
Ido kihon
Seven sets of moving drills
Sai kata
Hanagushiku no sai - view video
Kyan no sai


The iron sai was used in older days by officals to arrest crimminals and to hold back crowds. It was actually invented to defend against attacks from swords, bo, nunchaku and tuifa.
A pair of iron sticks about 460cm long with U shaped handles, the sai are a heavy effective weapon.


sai parts
1. TSUKAGASHIRA - Handle butt
2. TSUKA - Handle
3. MOTO - Centre point between side guards
4. YOKO - Side guard
5. TSUME- Side guard tip
6. MONOUCHI- Blade
7. SAKI - Tip of blade
with the Bo. He has taught many senior Matsubayashi ryu yudansha the Yamanni ryu tradition's of ;

  • Shushi no kun
  • Sakugawa no kun
  • Shirataru no kun
  • Shinakachi no kun
  • Yonegawa no kun
  • Choun no kun
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Herlihy sensei with kama
pair of kama
In 1470, when traditional weapons were confiscated by the Japanese military, Okinawan commoners utilized the kama (sickle) as a fighting blade.
The kama was originally used for cutting grass. In close range fighting, it could be used to trap an opponent's weapon, or for striking.
The kama is most commonly used in kata  competition and demonstrations. The forms include circular movements which improve blocking and countering techniques.
Bo
kama parts
1. USHIRO TSUKAGASHIRA - Handle butt
2. MOTO - Centre of handle
3. GEDAN TSUKAGASHIRA - Top of handle
4. MONOUCHI - Blade
5. SAKI - Tip of blade

Kobudo. Bo
Shihandai Higa & Herlihy sensei
Shihandai Higa & Shihan Plaisted
 Shihan Kevin Plaisted, Kyoshi, 7th dan & Shihandai,  Nobuhide Higa, Hanshi, 9th dan, of Taira dojo.
Shihandai, Higa & Sensei Timothy Herlihy
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pair of tonfa
Shihan Plaisted Herlihy sensei
The Bo (often called kun or kon) is a staff of hard wood usually oak about 1800mm long and 25mm - 28mm in diameter. It was originally used as a tool to carry loads and also served as a fighting tool when the occasion arose. In Okinawa there are many varieties of the art of bo-jutsu. Our dojo follow the Matsubayashi Ryu / Yamanni Ryu Bo technique as taught in Kodokan Taira dojo. Direct lines of development are via the Shinyei Kyan  and Chogi Kishaba  lineages.
Kihon
Techniques from Taira dojo.

Tonfa kata
Tonfa no kata 
bo parts
1. SAKI - End
2. MOTO - Middle
3. SAKI - End
The Tonfa or Tuifa, refers to two pieces of rectangular hard wood, each about 38cm to 51cm long, with a grip attached. It is claimed they originated as a millstone  handle. What ever its origin it is effective as both a defensive and attacking weapon. Use includes blocking, striking, thrusting and twirling and it is ideally suited to complementing karate techniques.
tonfa parts
1. ZENTO - Front tip
2. E GASHIRA - Hand grip pommel
3. E NIGIRI - Hand grip
4. SOKUMEN - Side
5. JOMEN - Top
6. MONOUCHI ZOKO - Bottom
7. KOTO - Rear tip
8. MONOUCHI - Main shaft

Bo kata
Bo kata practiced within
Matsubayashi Ryu NZ dojo
under the guidance of :
Kancho, Yoshitaka Taira, Hanshi 10th dan & Shihandai, Nobuhide Higa, Hanshi 9th dan.

Shushi no kun ichi  >

Shushi no kun ni

Choun no kun ichi  >

Choun no kun ni  >

Shiromatsu no kun ichi

Shiromatsu no kun ni  >

Shirotaro no kun ichi

Shirotaro no kun ni

Sakugawa no kun
Nunchaku is a pair of hard wooden sticks joined with a short rope or chain. The centrifugal force produced by swinging the nunchaku makes it an effective weapon.
It is often said that nunchaku were originally used in the rice thrashing process. However, it is more likely that they were derived from horse bridles. It makes a good training weapon, helping to develop quicker hand movements and improving posture.
1. HIMO - Rope
2. ANA - Hole
3. KONTO - Top
4. JOKON BU - Upper area
5. CHUKON BU - Middle area
6. KIKON BU - Lower area
7. KONTEI - Bottom
 

Sai
Kobudo. Sai
sai parts
1. TSUKAGASHIRA - Handle butt
2. TSUKA - Handle
3. MOTO - Centre point between side guards
4. YOKO - Side guard
5. TSUME- Side guard tip
6. MONOUCHI- Blade
7. SAKI - Tip of blade
The iron sai was used in older days by officals to arrest crimminals and to hold back crowds. It was actually invented to defend against attacks from swords, bo, nunchaku and tuifa.
A pair of iron sticks about 460cm long with U shaped handles, the sai are a heavy effective weapon.


Ido kihon
Seven sets of moving drills
Sai kata
Hanagushiku no sai  >

Kyan no sai


Kama
Kobudo. Kama
In 1470, when traditional weapons were confiscated by the Japanese military, Okinawan commoners utilized the kama (sickle) as a fighting blade.
The kama was originally used for cutting grass. In close range fighting, it could be used to trap an opponent's weapon, or for striking.
The kama is most commonly used in kata  competition and demonstrations. The forms include circular movements which improve blocking and countering techniques.
kama parts
1. USHIRO TSUKAGASHIRA - Handle butt
2. MOTO - Centre of handle
3. GEDAN TSUKAGASHIRA - Top of handle
4. MONOUCHI - Blade
5. SAKI - Tip of blade

Tonfa
Kobudo. Tonfa
The Tonfa or Tuifa, refers to two pieces of rectangular hard wood, each about 38cm to 51cm long, with a grip attached. It is claimed they originated as a millstone  handle. What ever its origin it is effective as both a defensive and attacking weapon. Use includes blocking, striking, thrusting and twirling and it is ideally suited to complementing karate techniques.
tonfa parts
1. ZENTO - Front tip
2. E GASHIRA - Hand grip pommel
3. E NIGIRI - Hand grip
4. SOKUMEN - Side
5. JOMEN - Top
6. MONOUCHI ZOKO - Bottom
7. KOTO - Rear tip
8. MONOUCHI - Main shaft
Kihon
Techniques from Taira dojo.

Tonfa kata
Tonfa no kata 
Nunchaku
Nunchaku is a pair of hard wooden sticks joined with a short rope or chain. The centrifugal force produced by swinging the nunchaku makes it an effective weapon.
It is often said that nunchaku were originally used in the rice thrashing process. However, it is more likely that they were derived from horse bridles. It makes a good training weapon, helping to develop quicker hand movements and improving posture.
1. HIMO - Rope
2. ANA - Hole
3. KONTO - Top
4. JOKON BU - Upper area
5. CHUKON BU - Middle area
6. KIKON BU - Lower area
7. KONTEI - Bottom